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Tuesday
Jun242003

Austrian Culinary Delights

Che AndyWhile everyone else is commenting on Apple's new PowerMac G5, 64-bit desktop tower computer, or Microsoft's new Windows Mobile (a.k.a. Pocket PC 2003), I've decided to get this week's blog posts rolling with something completely different.

Here at the Rohde household, we have a special guest with us for the next two weeks. Andy Bauer is a very good friend from way, way back. We've known each other since the early Macintosh days when we both used Powerbook Duos and were regular posters on the popular and now defunct, Powerlist.

Andy has actually visited us twice before: first for my marriage to Gail in September 1999 and again in April 2002 just for the fun of it. Gail, I and our friends have thoroughly enjoyed Andy's visits and all of the fun activities we've had with him. So, Andy decided to get away from his daily grind and give Milwaukee a try in the midst of summer.

Now, Andy is an Austrian (living in London) and on this third trip over, he's brought along some traditional Austrian recipes to make for us. On Saturday evening, I was fortunate to enjoy the results of his first experimental culinary delight, Marillenknödel, or apricot dumplings. Andy told me that these "fruit dumplings" were really of Czech origin, but since the Czech republic was part of Austria in the old days of the empire, the recipe is known more as an Austrian speciality.

In brief, a Marillenknödel is an apricot with the pit removed and replaced by a sugar cube, then wrapped in a thin layer of egg dough. The dumpling is boiled; when it pops to the surface it's rolled in bread-crumbs sauteed in butter then sprinkled with powdered sugar.

Mmmmmm, they were delicious and surprisingly filling! I was also surprised to learn that Marillenknödel are a main course in Austria, which for me was a bit odd since they're sweet. However I can see how 4 or 5 off these guys would be very filling. They certainly filled us up!

Andy was able to translate all of the ingredients for the dumpling dough properly (particularly a complex equation to get flour weight into cups) and make very tasty Marillenknödel in the unknown environment of an American kitchen. In fact he said they were quite good -- almost as good as his grandmother's.

So, you may be asking yourself, "what does this story of Marillenknödel have to do with technology?" My answer is... nothing. This is my weblog and I can write what I like... besides, I like to think of the my weblog as an occasional respite from the flurry of high-tech news and rumor-mongering. So there. :-)

In fact, for the next two weeks it's likely I'll not be posting as often as normal, as we'll be spending time during these brief two weeks with Andy. However, it might provide some funny experiences with our guest, so stay tuned...

Reader Comments (1)

Makes me wish there was such a thing as FoodEx so that I could sample these things. :D
June 25, 2003 | Unregistered Commentermashby

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